BetterAddictionCare

Find a Drug Rehab for Methedrine Addiction

Is your teen using meth? Find out why it is critical to find a drug rehab for Methedrine that will get them clean and sober

If you are concerned that your teen is abusing meth, your best option is to get them into drug rehab for Methedrine addiction at once before permanent damage can occur. Methadrine is a brand name for methamphetamine, one of the most damaging drugs on the market. The 2015 Monitoring the Future survey by the National Institute for Drug Abuse found that some teens started abusing Methedrine and other amphetamines as early as the eighth grade. Long-term use of this drug can create devastating physical and neurological damage that can last a lifetime. The good news is that Meth addiction is treatable, particularly if you get your loved one into an accredited Methedrine addiction recovery program early in the addiction process.

How to tell if your teen needs Methedrine addiction treatment

Methedrine is a powerful stimulant that is far deadlier than cocaine. When users smoke or inject this drug, it creates an instant feeling of euphoria followed by a major crash. The other symptoms of Methadrine abuse can linger for several hours, so learning to recognize them may help you to identify if y our child has a problem.  The short-term effects of Methedrine abuse include increased wakefulness and a heightened state of alertness. Meth users may be restless and anxious, with an irregular heartbeat and elevated temperature, heart rate, and blood pressure.

Why getting your teen into Methedrine addiction recovery is so important

Every time someone abuses Methedrine, the drug releases an enormous rush of dopamine, a key neurotransmitter that affects the pleasure and the reward center of the brain. Methedrine also blocks the re-absorption of dopamine, which creates incredibly high concentrations of the neurotransmitter in the brain. The euphoric effects the drug produces are short-lived, but the stimulant remains active in the body for a long time. It takes 12 hours for just half of the drug to leave users’ system. Bathing the brain in dopamine for so long can be toxic to the brain’s nerve terminals can create horrendous damage that is sometimes irreversible.

Some of the damage that long-term use of Methedrine can cause includes severe memory problems, increased distractibility, and deficits in motor skills. Meth addicts often distance themselves from family and friends and may display aggressive or violent behavior. Prolonged meth use causes addicts’ appearance to undergo drastic changes, leaving them with inflamed skin sores, hair loss, and trembling limbs. One of the most widely recognized characteristics of Methedrine addicts is “meth mouth” where individuals end up with broken, discolored, and rotting teeth from the acid erosion caused by the drug.

How Methedrine recovery programs can help

While the effects of Methedrine addiction can cause extensive damage if left unchecked, some of the damage may be reversible. When Methedrine recovery programs have successfully helped addicts to abstain from relapsing for at least 14 months, the individuals involved showed improvement on their performance on verbal memory and motor tests. Long term inpatient Methedrine recovery programs have shown the most success at helping meth addicts stay clean. Treatment begins with medically supervised detox, where medications can be given to alleviate withdrawal symptoms so the detox process is as comfortable as possible. After detox, Methedrine recovery treatment programs rely on cognitive-behavioral and contingency-management interventions, using a combination of cognitive, behavioral, and motivational methods to help users achieve long term recovery without relapses.

If you see indications that your teen or other loved one has begun abusing Methedrine, you should do whatever it takes get them into treatment immediately. You don’t have to try to find a drug rehab for Methedrine addiction on your own; the specialists at BetterAddictionCare are here to help. Call 1-800-429-7690.  We can help you look for recovery centers near you.

 

 

Sources:

https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/drugfacts/methamphetamine

https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/research-reports/methamphetamine/