Benzodiazepines Withdrawal Symptoms

Written by Peter Brooke

Learn more about the most common benzodiazepines withdrawal symptoms and how dangerous they can be if left untreated

Benzodiazepines is the name given to depressants and tranquilizers that are mainly used to relieve anxiety and treat sleeping problems. But, because of their strength, if a person has been using them – whether medically or recreationally – they will experience benzodiazepines withdrawal symptoms once they stop taking the drug.

Benzodiazepines withdrawal symptoms (or benzo withdrawal) is the name given to the sequence of reactions your body/system experiences when you stop the drug intake. This happens because your body has become dependent on the substance in order to function regularly.

When you are experiencing abuse problems with these type of medications (popular Benzodiazepines include Valium, Xanax, Ativan, and Klonopin), tolerance can be easily developed. This leads to the appearance of the benzodiazepines withdrawal symptoms even if you just decrease your dosage.

In order to be able to handle these symptoms, benzo withdrawal help is necessary. Some of the symptoms that come from withdrawal can be quite complex, and if they were mishandled or simply unaddressed, they could develop rapidly into life-threatening conditions.

A benzo withdrawal timeline is the common name given to the different stages in which benzodiazepine withdrawal symptoms appear. In order to understand the severity of the symptoms, we should look at these stages to see how everything transitions in a matter of hours.

It’s important to note that the benzo withdrawal timeline is not fixed. This means that the moment the symptoms start to appear, and how long they will last, will always depend on your particular abuse problem.

How long you’ve been abusing, the doses you’ve been taking, and your overall health, are all factors that affect how you experience a benzo withdrawal timeline.

In a general sense, the phases that you will experience will include:

  • Phase 1:   Within 24-72 hours after last dose – you will most-likely experience increased irritability and severe mood swings, sleep disturbance, body aches and inability to concentrate.
  • Phase II: Considered the acute stage of the timeline, it appears within 5 days from the last dose, and can last for a period of up to 90 days. This phase is characterized by moderate to severe depression, extreme anxiety, panic attacks, tremors, migraines, irregular heartbeat, and muscle spasms.
  • Phase III: During this last stage, a patient may experience benzodiazepine withdrawal symptoms that require special attention. A person may suffer from seizures, suicidal thoughts, paranoia, hypertension, visual disturbances, restless legs syndrome, etc.

Benzo withdrawal help is available through comprehensive detoxification and rehabilitation treatments. It is imperative to seek the help of specialists when dealing with a benzodiazepines abuse problem, because the symptoms are too severe and can change rapidly into situations where your life can be in danger.

Experienced personnel will offer the appropriate benzo withdrawal help and use the necessary tools to be able to help you get clean and recover in a safely manner.

Moreover, there are many facilities that offer the right environment to help you get clean and recover while keeping you safe and away from temptation. Inpatient rehabs are highly recommended when recovering from a benzodiazepines abuse problem.

If you want to find out more about benzodiazepines withdrawal symptoms, or you wish to receive help finding a treatment facility, call us today at (800) 429-7690.

 

 

 

Sources:

https://www.dea.gov/druginfo/drug_data_sheets/Benzodiazepines.pdf

https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/research-reports/misuse-prescription-drugs/summary

https://medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000798.htm