Pros and Cons of Co Ed Treatment Centers

Written by Chloe Nicosia

The advantages and disadvantages of co ed treatment centers for addiction

Where is there a drug rehab near me? Where are the co ed treatment centers near me? Is it better to participate in a gender specific drug rehab? For answers to these questions, call Better Addiction Care at (800) 429-7690. 

Gender Specific Drug Rehab

There are several treatment options available today when it comes to drug rehab. While addiction (a disease) affects women and men, it does not necessarily affect the genders equally. Each sex has their inherent differences, so, it makes sense that their experience with addiction might also be a bit different. In this setting, individuals find themselves in a comfortable and clean environment for rehabilitation without the distractions of the opposite sex.

Stimulant and opioid abuse may be especially dangerous for women because the effects could be very harmful to the menstrual cycle, as well as cardiac system, digestive system, nerves, and muscles. Women experience hormonal changes which may lead to stronger craving at certain times.

In addition to hormones and menstruation issues, women are more likely to be the main caregivers of their children (not men). Women are also more likely to be suffering from mood disorders – like bipolar disorder – than men. Because of the fear of losing custody of their children, woman may be more afraid to seek treatment.

When it comes to pregnancy, drugs are known to cause damage to the fetus. These include low birth weight, miscarriage, and premature separation of the placenta from the uterus wall. Mental defects are also common babies whose mother is a drug addict. Once the baby is born, if the mother breast feeds while continuing to use drugs, she may pass the drugs through her milk to the baby. Sounds horrific – but it happens. Have you ever seen a pregnant woman having a cigarette or glass of wine? This is not uncommon.

Women tend to be victims of physical violence at the hands of their intimate partners. Behaviors range from slapping and pushing to being beaten, raped, burned, or choked. Victims of domestic violence are at a higher risk for chronic health conditions, such as depression and obesity, which may lead to substance abuse. Women may be more comfortable sharing their story if there are not any men around.

Co Ed Treatment Centers

When considering co ed treatment centers, keep in mind that it is strictly frowned upon to engage in a romantic relationship while in rehab. For the most part, this is a distraction from the reason you are getting help. In some cases, you may be asked to leave if it is found out that you are doing so. So, no sex during your stay. If you cannot comply, then figure out another way to get sober. Relationships are a distraction – so please avoid them during the early phases of your recovery.  This is certainly a matter of life and death. Think about it before you form a negative opinion about it.

Remember that drug addiction is the cause of death for many people. Becoming romantically involved with someone at rehab could be the reason you are asked to leave the rehab – and not complete your treatment. What is more important? You could end up dead in a ditch somewhere because of your addiction.

Is it really worth pursuing a relationship with another human being who is an addict and going through their own struggle? If you are unwilling to comply with the “no romance rule,” you may need to figure out what is really important in your life. If you cannot handle co ed treatment centers, you may opt for gender specific drug rehab.

With so much information on this topic, you may want to do a little reading up on the subject and see what you find. If you still need assistance with regard to “where is there a drug rehab near me?” Call Better Addiction Care and we will point you in the right direction to finding the right treatment centers that will meet your needs.

 

 

Sources:

https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/research-reports/substance-use-in-women/sex-gender-differences-in-substance-use