BetterAddictionCare

I Want to Stop Drinking But All My Friends Drink – Tips for a Recovering Alcoholic

I Want to Stop Drinking But All My Friends Drink: What to Drink When You Don’t Drink Alcohol

Far too often we hear patients say “I want to stop drinking but all my friends drink.” It’s unfortunate, but it’s an extremely common situation to be in as a recovering alcoholic. Alcohol is everywhere, and the vast majority of the population does drink alcohol. That can make being celebrations and social functions very tempting for sober party goers. Staying sober at parties, or really in an environment where drinking is present, can feel like a difficult and almost insurmountable task. However, it is possible, and with a few relatively simple tips, knowing what to drink when you don’t drink alcohol can be easier than you ever imagined.

I Want to Stop Drinking But All My Friends Drink: Have an Escape Plan

Much like any difficult situation, you always want to have an exit strategy when you’re planning on going somewhere potentially triggering or tempting. Let your friend’s know that you may have to leave early if things become difficult for you. Similarly, if you are uncomfortable with sharing that sort of information with your friends, you can always have a sober friend call you and give you an excuse to leave if the need ever arises. Sometimes the easiest way to stay straight when you’re struggling with staying sober at parties, is to leave the party all together. While this isn’t ideal, you’re sobriety should be your number one priority, and if the need arises, you should not hesitate when it comes to leaving.

I Want to Stop Drinking But All My Friends Drink: Carry a Non-Alcoholic Drink

While knowing what to drink when you don’t drink alcohol can feel difficult at times, it’s not as hard as it can sometime feel. At parties, there will always be people trying to pour you drinks when they see you don’t have one. That’s because everyone loves to relate to one another, if I’m feeling happy, I want you to feel happy with me. Similarly, if I’m feeling intoxicated, I want everyone around me to be similarly intoxicated. It’s a natural way to look at at human behavior, we all want to relate to one another. While this makes the behavior somewhat understandable, it doesn’t make the situation any easier to deal with as a sober individual. When you try staying sober at parties, one of the best remedies for this type of situation is to carry a non-alcoholic drink with you at all times. It can be as simple as a water, or as complex as a virgin drink if you want to feel more connected to the party. Whatever you decide to drink, having the cup in your hand will help discourage people from tempting you with other more alcoholic offers.

I Want to Stop Drinking But All My Friends Drink: Offer to Be the Designated Driver for Your Party

If you look at tips for staying sober, you’ll notice the reoccurring theme of accountability. That’s because doing the right thing is much easier when you know someone is going to check to make sure you’re sticking to your word. So what better trick for staying sober at parties than offering to be the designated driver for your friends? This gives you a level of accountability, as you are responsible for the safety of your friends during the drive home, but it also gives you a convenient and easily understood excuse for abstaining from alcohol during your time at the party.

I Want to Stop Drinking But All My Friends Drink: Remember You’re Not Alone

Whether you’re trying to figure out what to drink when you don’t drink alcohol, or you’re just trying to stay sober at parties, the most important thing to remember is that you’re not alone in this experience. Every year, millions of people are admitted into rehabilitation programs for drug addiction and alcoholism, and in that same span of time, those millions of people will be trying to prevent the same type of relapses you’re trying to prevent now. Abstaining from alcohol during social outings and large events is nothing to be ashamed of, in fact, it’s probably the most responsible thing anyone can do in these situations, regardless of addiction. If you’re ever struggling, just remember you are not alone.

 

Sources:

https://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/arh23-2/151-160.pdf