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Is Ativan Addictive?

Is Ativan Addictive When Taken As Directed?

Ativan, a benzodiazepine, is a powerful psychoactive drug. Have you wondered, “Is Ativan addictive?” The answer is yes, Ativan (lorazepam) is highly addictive. When individuals become addicted to Ativan they display similar symptoms as a person who is intoxicated. According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, the person high on Ativan will have slurred speech, ataxia, and poor physical coordination.

Is Ativan Addictive?

Is Ativan addictive? Addiction knows no boundaries, and Ativan presents a higher rate of addiction that many other drugs. If an individual takes the drug longer than the recommended time period or takes a more frequent dose than prescribed, there is a increased risk of developing a dependence on Ativan. It is not uncommon for people strictly following the prescribed dose to develop a dependence on this powerful drug.

When a person becomes dependent they need to keep taking Ativan to function normally. Because Ativan is associated with a high risk of addiction, it is only recommended for short-term use. There are severe side effects associated with higher than recommended doses, which include respiratory depression, excessive sedation, seizures, tremors, memory impairment, and loss of consciousness. Long-term use can result in cognitive impairment. Without the drug, the person will experience uncomfortable physical and emotional withdrawal symptoms including the following:

The negative impact of addiction on a person’s life can result in financial difficulties, job loss, and a broken family. All ages, genders, races, and income levels are affected equally by this chronic brain disease called addiction. Without treatment, there is little hope of recovery. Better Addiction Care (BAC) is a free referral service staffed by addiction specialists who will assess your needs and refer you to a facility that meets your requirements. You can call them at 1.800.429.7690.

What Is Lorazepam?

What is lorazepam? Normally used for short-term treatment for insomnia, anxiety, depression, and seizures, lorazepam is a benzodiazepine. It is highly addictive and has many dangerous side effects. Individuals who become dependent on the drug generally self-medicate rather than follow the prescribed amount. This pattern of misuse leads to addiction. Lorazepam, like all benzodiazepines, is a central nervous system depressant. Heart regulation, respiration, blood pressure, and body temperature are all under the control of the central nervous system.

The use of lorazepam slows down these functions interfering with how the body and brain communicate. The brain is easily stimulated by stress and anxiety, and benzodiazepines inhibit the interpretation of neurotransmitters to produce calm, sedative, and relaxing effects. The pleasant and relaxing feelings are the reasons some people will self-medicate and start increasing the dose they take of lorazepam. Users can quickly develop a tolerance and need to take a larger dose to maintain the good feelings the drug provides.

Lorazepam Addiction

Beating lorazepam addiction is not something a person does on their own. Professional help is needed to get through the withdrawal process and into a healthy recovery. Because the symptoms of withdrawal can vary, it’s very important you are totally honest when you have an addiction treatment assessment. Be very clear about how large a dose you took and how often. This information will be used to create a precise treatment program for you or your loved one. Withdrawal symptoms can include the following:

Call BAC at 1.800.429.7690 and discuss your needs with an addiction specialist who can arrange to connect you with a facility that provides medical detox to make withdrawal as comfortable as possible. Today is the day to turn your life around.

Sources:

https://www.rxlist.com/ativan-drug.htm

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10770462

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/demystifying-psychiatry/201505/how-many-people-take-benzodiazepines

https://www.mentalhelp.net/articles/the-effects-of-benzodiazepines-like-ativan-and-xanax-on-mental-health/