Talking To Your Loved One About Addiction

Written by Chloe Nicosia

Talking To Your Loved One About Addiction When The Addiction Is Yours

Recognizing you suffer from an addiction can be both devastating and empowering. It is devastating because addiction causes physical and mental health problems, but it is empowering because recognition gives you the element of control. How to go about talking to your loved one about addiction can be challenging, but the following suggestions should be helpful.

Talking To Your Loved One About Addiction

Quite often family and friends recognize the signs of addiction in someone they love long before the individual does. Some people avoid broaching the subject simply to avoid controversy, but the relationship starts to suffer. Other people are enablers and actually help the addicted individual by making excuses for their behavior. Now that you recognize you have an addiction problem and are ready to seek help, you need the support of those you love. Talking to your loved one about addiction may reveal he or she (spouse, partner, parent, sibling, close friend) already suspected there was a problem. Whether the addiction relates to alcohol or to drugs, getting it out in the open is an important step towards recovery.

  • Talk to a physician, counselor, or visit a support group to help plan how your talk should go.
  • Research the addiction problem you have, and find out where help is available.
  • Tell you loved one you have a physical and emotional problem you need to discuss.
  • If you know when and how it began (following an illness, a devastating loss, peer pressure, depression), and acknowledge you need and desire help.
  • Talk about the need for help and how to obtain it.
  • Don’t lie. You have probably lied often about your addiction-related behavior. Now it is very important to be truthful, and don’t try to justify your actions.
  • Ask for his or her support and encouragement as you enter a rehab facility to get the help you need.

How To Tell Someone You’re An Addict

Not every loved one is instantly strong enough to handle the admission of your addiction. Knowing how to tell someone you’re an addict can be different for each important person in your life. There may have been lies or theft that has weakened the relationship with him or her. Following through with getting treatment will show your sincerity and determination to regain control of your life. Better Addiction Care provides a free referral service to assist you with locating the best addiction treatment facility to care for your specific needs. You can talk to a rehab specialist at 1.800.429.7690, and discuss your addiction issues.

How To Talk To Family About Addiction

Are you afraid you don’t know how to talk to family about addiction? The most important thing to remember is the fact that addiction is not a moral issue. Addiction is a disease, and must be treated as such. While under the influence of the disease you have made bad choices and maybe burned a few bridges. Honesty is crucial when it comes to how to talk to family about addiction. Sincerely apologize for any embarrassment you have caused, for your behavior, and for any pain you have inflicted on loved ones. Ask them to support you as you go through detox, rehab, and recovery from addiction.

Contact Better Addiction Care at 1.800.429.7690 and explain your situation. They will help you locate an excellent facility that provides the services you need including medical detox, rehab, traditional and alternative therapies, and relapse prevention counseling. It;s time to turn your life around, and talking to your loved ones is the first step.

Sources:

https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/principles-drug-addiction-treatment-research-based-guide-third-edition/frequently-asked-questions/where-can-family-members-go-information

https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/principles-drug-addiction-treatment/frequently-asked-questions/how-can-families-friends-make-difference-in-life-

https://www.ncadd.org/get-help/take-the-test/am-i-drug-addicted

https://www.helpguide.org/articles/addictions/drug-abuse-and-addiction.htm