How to Help Your Addicted Spouse

Written by Chloe Nicosia

How to Help Your Addicted Spouse – What You Can Do and How to Stage an Intervention

Undoubtedly, addiction is one of the most destructive mental disorders, and it’s one that has a great impact of behavior. When a person finds themselves married to an addict, then they also suffer from the many problems that addiction causes. In this article, we will discuss how to help your addicted spouse.

A Wide-Spread Problem

While it may feel like an isolating problem, there are many people who are going through the same struggles. In this United States, a little over 20 million people were found to be current users of alcohol and drugs in 2014 to the extent that they were addicted. Some estimates put the number of addicts with spouses at 12 million people.

Don’t Struggle Alone

How to help your addicted spouse starts with you taking care of yourself and your needs first. If you are mentally and physically exhausted by having to deal with the addiction in a loved one, then how can you be expected to be of assistance in the situation?

The ultimate goal of how to help your addicted spouse is to stop enabling their behavior, avoid the trappings of a co-dependent relationship, improve the communication in your relationship, and to improve your coping skills. You can achieve this by doing the following:

  • Realize that help is all around you and reach out to support groups for help.
  • Be an active part of your spouse’s recovery by joining their counseling sessions.
  • Learn all that you can about addiction to better understand the problems that plague your spouse.
  • Get professional help for problems that you can work through without your partner, such as your own possible mental disorders or the damage that your partner caused you.
  • Take care of yourself physically by getting a good night’s rest and eating healthy foods.
  • Take care of the important things in your life such as taking care of your kids, even if your partner is absent.
  • Learn about the treatment process to better assist your spouse through it.

How to Help an Addict Get Help

If you are wondering how to help an addict get help if they are still abusing drugs or alcohol then you should consider an intervention. An intervention can be the ideal solution on how to help a spouse with alcohol addiction or any substance use disorder.

The following looks at how to stage an intervention.

  • Find a professional – Before you get started on how to help a spouse with alcohol addiction or any kind of substance use disorder, then consider getting professional help. An addiction intervention specialist can drastically increase the success of the intervention and take many of the stresses off your shoulders.
  • Information gathering – How to help your addicted spouse with an intervention starts with the collection of information regarding their substance abuse. This includes gathering information on how addiction works.
  • Gather your team – The people who should be involved in the intervention should be people who want to see the addict get help. Set a date and time that works for everyone and discuss what is required of each person. The addict shouldn’t know about the intervention beforehand.
  • Plan what to say – Each person should make a note of what they will say before they enter the meeting. Avoid attacking the addict.
  • Find treatment and consider consequences – Have a rehab program ready for the addict to enter into straight after the intervention, and if they refuse to go then set an ultimatum which outlines what will happen if they don’t get help.

If you or a loved one is struggling with addiction, get help right away. Make a phone call that will connect you to a professional drug treatment center. The call you make may save your life or the life of someone you love. Call us today at 1.800.429.7690.

Sources:

https://www.samhsa.gov/data/sites/default/files/NSDUH-FRR1-2014/NSDUH-FRR1-2014.pdf

https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/resource-guide-screening-drug-use-in-general-medical-settings/screen-then-intervene-conducting-brief-intervention