Better Addiction Care

Most Addictive Drugs



There is a fine line between substance abuse and addiction. In some cases, the two go hand in hand. Even if people suggest that they are only using drugs casually, there is a good chance that addiction is still playing a role in their continued use. Addiction takes place when a person can no longer stop taking a drug, even if they want to quit. Alcohol can also be addictive, creating a compulsion to drink, even if the goal is to get sober. But which are the most addictive drugs? Researchers have studied a variety of addictive substances over the years, and five substances stand out when it comes to the ease of addiction and the difficulty of getting clean.

  1. Heroin: Heroin is not only the most addictive illegal drug, but it's the most addictive drug overall. One in four people who try heroin become addicted, and it also carries with it a startlingly high risk of overdose. Heroin is also a type of opioid, a class of substances that also includes some of the most addictive pills, pain medications like oxycodone and hydrocodone.
  2. Alcohol: While alcohol is legally available and used by some to little or no ill effect, as many as 30 percent of American adults have wrestled with alcohol abuse or alcoholism.
  3. Cocaine: Around 20 percent of those who try this drug will become addicted, research has shown.
  4. Barbiturates: This type of drug is prescribed for those who suffer from anxiety disorders or sleep disorders, but they're also among the most addictive pills out there. These have become less popular in recent decades and have been largely supplanted by benzodiazepines, which are also addictive.
  5. Nicotine: There's a reason why so many people find it so hard to quit smoking. In fact, nicotine addiction is the most common type of addiction in America.

However, just because a substance isn't on this list doesn't mean that it's harmless. Whether you're abusing the most addictive drug or one that only rarely leads to dependence, addiction is still possible. If you find that you can't stop drinking or abusing drugs, you need effective addiction treatment, and that's where we come in.

BetterAddictionCare works with a nationwide recovery network to help patients struggling with addiction to drugs and alcohol, and when you call today to speak with a counselor, we can help you, too. No one treatment plan will work for everyone, and that's why we use a customized approach, learning more about you and your specific needs before helping you to find the right treatment option. Rehabilitation is possible with help from highly trained professionals, who can provide a medically supervised detox to keep you safe and comfortable during withdrawal. The most addicting drugs can have some of the most unpleasant withdrawal effects, so professional treatment is especially important at this stage. Then, you can progress to learning better coping strategies and getting to the root of your addiction through addiction counseling and alternative rehab programs.

When you're ready to make a change, BetterAddictionCare is available to support and assist you. We can work with your private insurance to establish cost-effective treatment. We can coordinate with a facility of your choosing to arrange transportation. We can even set up a recovery team near you once treatment is complete to help you avoid a relapse. Fill out our contact form to learn more about your options and find a facility that's accepting new patients now.


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