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Asking for Help in Recovery: 5 Tips

Tips for Asking for Help in Recovery

Many people struggling to break free from a cycle of addiction eventually come to the realization that they need help. Yet it’s not always easy asking for help in recovery. A person who is addicted to drugs or alcohol may begin to realize they need help when their own levels of use spiral out of control. Yet rather than asking for help in recovery, many people will look for alternative options that might allow them to break the cycle of addiction on their own.

Why Is Asking for Help in Recovery So Hard?

There are a number of reasons why people avoid asking for help in recovery. Some people simply don’t think they need help, believing they can somehow just go cold turkey and quit using on their own. Others fool themselves into believing they still have their drug or alcohol use under control.

Still others may feel an overwhelming sense of guilt or shame at the idea of having to confess that they have a problem and need to ask someone else for help. There are also some people that may fear or want to avoid the judgment or criticism of others if they’re asking for help in recovery

As a result, far too many people never get the help they really need to get clean and stay sober for good.  Learning how to ask for help for addiction and knowing the right people or resources to reach out to could be the first step on the path to recovery.

How to Ask for Help for Addiction

There are a number of ways of asking for help in recovery, not all of which involve reaching out and discussing your problem face-to-face. Here are some tips for asking for help in addiction recovery.

Search for online resources: Some people may recognize that they need help, but they’re often not comfortable expressing that need to another person. In this case, searching for recovery resources online could be incredibly helpful. There are plenty of great resources available online, including chat rooms, AA meetings, SMART Recovery forums and online meetings, Facebook groups, and loads of information about treatment options. One of the best things about searching online for how to ask for help in recovery is that there are vast communities of people out there all willing to share their own experiences and provide any help they can.

Call a helpline: There are plenty of different helplines available that allow you to call and speak to someone with lots of knowledge about mental health and the psychology behind addictive behaviors. Many people struggling with how to ask for help for addiction find speaking to someone over the phone to be less confronting than reaching out and discussing problems face-to-face.

Speak to a medical professional: Addiction is a chronic disease, so it’s considered a medical issue. If you’re struggling with the idea of asking for help in recovery, take time to make an appointment with your doctor. A medical professional will know the proper things to ask in order to correctly determine the right course of treatment to take.

Seek out others in the same position: If you’re like most people, it’s likely that you already know someone who has recovered from addiction. Talking to someone who has gotten clean and learned positive ways to stay sober can be helpful. People in recovery often know of resources or support groups that could help. However, if you don’t know someone personally, consider reaching out to a local group support meeting.

Write it down: Some people may find that using a non-verbal medium can be easier than expressing difficult emotions out loud. Writing down some of the things you want to say can suddenly make problems and fears seem more real.

When it comes to tips for asking for help in addiction recovery, there is no right or wrong answer. The key to beginning your journey to recovery is to find an option that works best for your needs. The important thing to remember is that you’ve recognized that you need help and you’re exploring your options.

If you’re struggling with addiction and/or maintaining sobriety, contact Better Addiction Care today. We’ll help you find the right treatment program for your needs. Call us at 1.800.429.7690.