BetterAddictionCare

How to Find an Outpatient Alcohol Rehab (and What to Expect)

The Best Way to Find an Outpatient Alcohol Rehab, and What You Can Expect

According to recent findings in the 2017 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, of the people aged 12 or older, 16.7 million were partaking in heavy alcohol use. Of all these people, 14.5 million met the criteria for alcohol use disorder, also referred to as alcoholism. Rehab programs is by far the best way to overcome alcohol use disorder. To help you find the nearest outpatient alcohol rehab, we will explore one of the easiest ways to find a local rehab, and discuss what one can expect at these programs. 

Learn how outpatient alcohol rehab can help you today.

The Easiest Way to Find Outpatient Alcohol Rehab

Before we look at what you can expect during outpatient alcohol rehab, we will first explore how to find an outpatient alcohol rehab near me.

There is a surprising number of alcohol treatment centers in the United States; according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), there are more than 14,500 specialized treatment centers across the country. But finding a good outpatient alcohol rehab near me can still feel challenging. Every rehab makes promises, but not all of them are able to keep their promises. So, how can one find the good rehabs amidst the more than 14,500 nationwide? Better Addiction Care have created a solution: our rehab locator.

We have reviewed each of the rehabs, exploring the types of treatment programs, accreditation, insurance coverage, and everything else that they offer and summarized it for you. We have also provided reviews from the clientele so that you can hear first-hand what the rehab is like, and how it has changed people’s lives.

To use to rehab locator, follow the steps below:

  1. On the current page, scroll up or down until you see the “Search for Facility” section on the right-hand side.
  2. Enter the city, state, or zip code you would like to search in. Alternatively, look through the states listed in the section and click on the one that applies to you.
  3. If you searched by state, then on the new page you will see a list of counties and cities in the chosen state near the top. Select either a city or county that you would like to find an outpatient alcohol rehab in. You may also scroll down to see a list of all the alcohol treatment centers in the state.
  4. If you searched by city, county, zip code, or selected a city or county from the list, then the page will show you all of the rehab centers in the area. Scrolling further down will also reveal AA meetings in the area.
  5. Click on the rehab that interests you to see more about the rehab, such as the types of programs they offer, its location, and more.

What to Expect at an Outpatient Rehab for Alcohol Addiction

Outpatient rehab for alcohol abuse is an effective method of treatment for alcohol use disorder. It generally employs the latest in evidence-based therapy to assist addicts with beating the disease of addiction. According to NIDA, intensive outpatient programs are as effective at treating alcohol use disorder in residential rehab programs, as long as the programs don’t just offer addiction education.

Why People Choose Outpatient Rehab

Outpatient rehab is the most popular form of treatment for various reasons, including:

What to Expect – The Process of Outpatient Treatment

Choosing to get help for alcohol use disorder is both one of the best decisions you’ll ever make and one that can fill you with fear. To help ease any fears or doubt you may have, we will look at what the process is that you’ll go through in outpatient treatment for alcohol use disorder.

Intake and Assessment

The first thing that will happen when you start your rehab program is a thorough assessment during the intake. You should prepare yourself to be asked about many personal things to assess your mental health. The main purpose of the assessment is to prepare an optimal treatment plan because a treatment plan that worked wonders for one person may not be as effective for other people.

The assessment is also to establish the extent of the addiction, and if there are other drugs involved with the alcohol abuse as it can affect the detoxification period. Detox from alcohol by itself can be very dangerous, and in rarer cases, life-threatening. Your current health and the extent of the alcohol addiction play a role in how severe the symptoms will be. It may be necessary for a heavily-addicted person to go through a medical detox, which may need to be completed at an inpatient facility or clinic.

While it may be strange to be asked so many personal questions about your abuse, it’s important to be as honest as possible because it is through this honestly that the most effective treatment plan will emerge.

Be Ready to Explore Underlying Psychological Problems and Emotions in Therapy

There are many different therapeutic techniques; some require that the addict open up about

personal matters while others only require that the person talk about what they want to talk about. With all forms of evidence-based treatment, you can expect to discuss things that may make you feel uncomfortable at first, but it will become easier as time goes by.

Be Willing to Learn

An important aspect of beating a disease like addiction is education. Many people still hold the belief that addiction happens to those who have weak willpower or make poor decisions. In rehab, you’ll learn about the facts of addiction because through this understanding, therapy, and possible medication, you will learn how to prevent the disease from taking hold again.

Expect to Meet Similar People

At rehab, you can meet many people that are going through similar situations. The friends you meet at rehab can not only help you make it through the program, but they can provide life-lines once you finish with rehab.

Expect a Focus on Relapse Prevention

Learning about how to prevent relapse is another key element of recovery. You will learn how to identify the stages and signs of relapse, and know what to do to prevent yourself from relapsing.

Sources:

https://www.samhsa.gov/data/report/2017-nsduh-annual-national-report

https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/principles-drug-addiction-treatment-research-based-guide-third-edition/drug-addiction-treatment-in-united-states