BetterAddictionCare

How to Make Friends in Recovery

Wondering how to make friends in recovery? Read on for some helpful tips.

Recovery can be a lonely time, and you may be wondering how to make friends in recovery. Since you’re no longer hanging out with your old, using friends, and you may have damaged some of your pre-addiction relationships, finding social support can be tough. The prospect of meeting new people can be daunting, but it’s important to have the support of friends and family in early recovery.

During treatment, particular attention is paid to developing essential social skills for better, more functional relationships. These include relationship skills like listening, being honest, and resolving conflict in healthy ways. But once you have the basics down, the question becomes how to make friends in recovery? How do you go about finding sober friends?

Here are some good ways to make friends in recovery.

Go to Meet-Up.com

Meet-up.com is an online forum that lets you find and join a group of people in your area who share your interests, and it’s a great pathway to finding sober friends. Groups form over nearly any interest, from sewing and dirt biking to coffee drinking and hula hooping. Look for a sober meet-up, which may have anywhere from ten to 200 members. Attending regular events gives you the opportunity to get to know others in the recovery community.

Volunteer

Volunteering in recovery can improve your self-confidence and self-esteem, and it’s a great opportunity to meet others who share a similar interest. Look for volunteer opportunities through community bulletins, or seek out opportunities with organizations you admire, such as the Red Cross or a neighborhood rec center.

Attend Meetings

Attending 12-step meetings has been shown through research to improve your chances of long-term recovery. This is largely due to the built-in support system comprised of your sober peers. These and other types of recovery meetings can be a great place to practice important social skills, such as being honest, and meet others who share similar goals.

Attend Religious Services

A religious institution offers opportunities to meet new people who share similar values. Shop around for a welcoming place of worship that aligns with your inherent beliefs, and engage in the programs and activities it offers.

Move Into a Sober Living Community

Sober living communities benefit the newly recovering in a number of ways. They offer a safe, stable place to live, and many have rules that promote a high level of personal accountability. Best of all, they provide the opportunity to develop close, healthy relationships with others who understand what you’re going through.

Stay Open to New Possibilities

When you think about how to make friends in recovery, it’s important to remind yourself to stay open to new possibilities. Take someone up on a cup of coffee. Take a risk, and ask someone whose company you enjoy to spend a day at the park, or the movies, or a concert. Take opportunities to introduce yourself to others, offer a helping hand, strike up a conversation in line. You never know where it may lead.

Being Friends With a Recovering Addict

If you’re on the other side of the coin and looking for ways to support a friend who’s in recovery, you may be wondering about the best way to go about being friends with a recovering addict. The best thing you can do is offer your friend love and encouragement. Relaxing and enjoying yourself is crucial for successful recovery, so engaging your friend in fun, sober activities can help, too.

Whether you need help for an addiction or someone you love has a substance abuse problem, Better Addiction Care can help you find a high quality treatment program. Treatment will help you develop the toolkit of skills and strategies, including how to make friends in recovery, that will promote a happy, healthy, and sober life for the long-term.

If you’d like to speak to professional, a call us at 1-800-429-7690 to be put in touch with a qualified counselor with experience in treatment for addiction.